UNSC unanimously adopts resolution tightening sanctions on North Korea

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UNSC unanimously adopts resolution tightening sanctions on North Korea

UNITED NATIONS, September 12. /TASS/. The UN Security Council has adopted a resolution tightening sanctions on North Korea in response to the country’s sixth nuclear test. The US-drafted document was supported by all members of the Security Council, including Russia and China.

The new resolution bans the exports of textiles from North Korea and imposes an embargo on gas condensate deliveries to the country. Besides, the UN Security Council has also capped crude oil and refined petroleum products deliveries. The document empowers countries to inspect vessels at sea, in case an embargo violation is suspected. The document includes sanctions against the Workers’ Party of Korea, including its Central Military Commission, as well as individual sanctions on North Korean Minister of People’s Armed Forces General Pak Yong Sik.

According to the US officials, added to the sanctions imposed on North Korea previously, new restrictions would cut North Korea’s exports by 90%. The textile ban alone is expected to cost Pyongyang about $726 million a year.

The United States submitted the draft resolution to the UN Security Council last week, but significant changes were introduced as a result of consultations. In particular, Washington abandoned the idea of cutting off oil supplies to North Korea and putting severe restrictions on the hiring of North Korean laborers, as well as imposing sanctions on North Koran leader Kim Jong-un.

The adopted document emphasizes the need to find a peaceful solution to the North Korea issue and confirms the importance of respecting the sovereignty of all states. It also says that the deteriorating situation on the Korean Peninsula may lead to dangerous consequences for regional security.

After the vote, US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said that Washington was not looking for war with North Korea, while Pyongyang has "not yet passed the point of no return." "If it agrees to stop its nuclear program, it can reclaim its future. If it proves it can live in peace, the world will live in peace with it," she added.